A piece of ice was thrown into a 90-meter ice well: look what happened to it Earth

A piece of ice was thrown into a 90-meter ice well: look what happened to it

Glaciologists drill deep wells in the Antarctic ice and extract cores from them — long columns of ice. The deeper the well, the older the ice at the end of the core. In this ice, scientists are looking for answers to questions about the composition of the atmosphere long before the start of observations.

Ice keeps traces of big events — nuclear explosions, volcanic eruptions; paleoclimatologists use it to date past changes in the CO2 content in the planet's atmosphere. And after the scientific work is over, round holes remain in the Antarctic ice sheets, into which you really want to throw something.

Scientists are also people, so that's what they do. Glaciologist Peter Neff recently threw a piece of ice into one of these 90-meter wells and recorded a video. Watch with sound: this is the new ice tapping on the ice of the century.